Sunday, April 06, 2014

USS Coronado Commissioned in Namesake City

USS Coronado Commissioned in Namesake City

Sailors man the rails during the commissioning ceremony of the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) at Naval Air Station North Island.
SAN DIEGO (April 5, 2014) Sailors man the rails during the commissioning ceremony of the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) at Naval Air Station North Island. Coronado is the second Independence-class littoral combat ship and the third Navy ship to bear the name Coronado. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Gerald Dudley Reynolds/Released)
By Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Donnie W. Ryan, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs
CORONADO, Calif (NNS) -- More than 4,000 guests watched as the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) joined the Navy's surface fleet during a commissioning ceremony at Naval Air Station North Island in Coronado, Calif., April 5.

Coronado is the fourth littoral combat ship, the second of the Independence variant, commissioned into service and will be be outfitted with reconfigurable mission packages and focus on a variety of mission areas including mine countermeasures, surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare.

"On behalf of the Secretary of the Navy, it's my pleasure to welcome the return of the name USS Coronado to the fleet," said Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson, guest speaker for the ceremony. "There is no finer city for this celebration, and no more Navy pride than there is in Coronado."

Ferguson talked about the nation's expectations of today's Navy and the role littoral combats ships like Coronado will play in the overall defense strategy and the Navy's ability to operate forward.

"The Navy's enduring forward presence ensures the security of the seas," said Ferguson. "With her speed, shallow draft and mission packages, Coronado is perfectly suited for service around the globe."

Susan Ring Keith, the daughter and stepdaughter of Navy admirals and a long-time leader in the San Diego community, was named as the ship's sponsor and christened the ship Jan. 14, 2012 during a ceremony in Mobile, Ala.

"I want the crew to know that they will carry the hearts and thanks of all the residents of Coronado. We are so proud of what you do for us and so proud that you carry our name," said Keith. "Now, I want you to man this ship and bring her to life."

The 2,790-ton Coronado was built by Austal USA Shipbuilding in Mobile, Ala., at a cost of $400 million and is 417 feet in length, has a waterline beam of 100 feet, and a navigational draft of 15 feet. Coronado uses two gas turbine and two diesel engines to power four steerable water jets and can reach speeds in excess of 40 knots.

Cmdr. Shawn Johnston, a native of North Carolina, is the commanding officer of the ship's Gold Crew. Cmdr. John Kochendorfer, from Dan Point, Calif., is the commanding officer of the ship's Blue Crew. Both will lead core crews of approximately 40 officers and enlisted personnel.

Hundreds of residents of Coronado, Calif., along with many city leaders including the mayor, attended the ceremony.

"I am happy to tell you that Coronado has been a proud Navy town for well over 100 years," said Mayor Casey Tanaka, who presented both Johnston and Kochendorfer a key to the city. "Please place this key somewhere all your Sailors can see it so that they know whenever they drive over the bridge or up the strand, that when they see that number of 26,600 people who live here in Coronado, they know they are one of us now and forever."

Named for the city of Coronado, Calif., LCS 4 is the third Navy ship to bear the name of the "Crown City." The first USS Coronado (PF 38) was a patrol frigate and served as a convoy escort during World War II.

The second USS Coronado (AGF 11) was designed as an Austin-class amphibious transport dock (LPD) and was reconfigured to be an auxiliary command ship (AGF) in 1980 and subsequently served as the Commander, Middle East Force flagship, then the Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet flagship in the Mediterranean, and subsequently the Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet flagship in the Eastern Pacific Ocean prior to decommissioning in 2006.

LCS vessels were designed to be high-speed, shallow draft multimission ships capable of operating independently or with an associated strike group. They are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in coastal waters.

A fast, maneuverable, and networked surface combatant, LCS provides the required warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions such as surface warfare, mine warfare and anti-submarine warfare.

LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system. Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables the ship to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting rapid technological updates. LCS employs advanced tactical networks to share information with aircraft, ships, submarines, joint and coalition units both at sea and shore.

Providing warships ready for combat, developing Sailors, and training crews to fight and win are the subjects of Vice Adm. Thomas H. Copeman III, commander of Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet's "Vision for the 2026 Surface Fleet." This vision consolidates a set of objectives and policies to maximize surface force readiness by concentrating on warfighting ability, sustainable excellence and wholeness over time.

For more news from Naval Surface Forces, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnsp/.

Stealth and Resilience: Meet the IDF’s New Submarines

Stealth and Resilience: Meet the IDF’s New Submarines
submarineheader
Graduates of the IDF’s Submariners course are about to receive a more advance training regimen, in order to keep up with the evolution of IDF submarine capabilities.
In 2014, the Israel Navy is expected to put two new advanced Dolphin-class submarines into service: the INS Crocodile, and the INS Rahav. These two submarines were acquired from Germany in 2012. With the introduction of these submarines into the fleet, submariner recruits will now undergo a new training regimen.

Friday, April 04, 2014

USS Stout Returns to Norfolk

USS Stout Returns to Norfolk


Family and friends welcome home the guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55).
NORFOLK (April 4, 2014) Family and friends welcome home the guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55). Stout returned to homeport at Naval Station Norfolk an eight-month deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Amber N. O'Donovan/Released)


From USS Stout Public Affairs
NORFOLK (NNS) -- Guided-missile destroyer USS Stout (DDG 55) returned to Naval Station Norfolk April 4 after an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility.

The ship departed Aug. 18, 2013 for the Mediterranean and has since covered more than 36,000 nautical miles in support of the nation's ballistic missile defense strategy.

"We provided a ready, flexible force where it mattered, when it mattered," said Cmdr. Robert Alpigini, Stout's commanding officer.

Arriving in theater as the Syria crisis was unfolding, Stout participated in interoperability exercises with more than 10 partner nations and allies, including Germany, Great Britain, France, Israel, Italy and Turkey. Stout capped her time in theater by participating in the maritime operation that re-took the vessel "Morning Glory" that had been seized by three armed pirates.

"A great deal was asked of this crew and at every point they shattered all expectations," said Alpigini. "Both my crew and our nation are stronger for what we have done over the last eight months."

In addition to the missions Stout conducted, her crew of nearly 280 Sailors found time to make tremendous personal strides. Thirty-eight Sailors were promoted and more than 120 earned their Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist designations.

A multi-mission ship, Stout is designed to conduct sustained combat operations in anti-air, anti-submarine, anti-surface, strike warfare and BMD environments. Stout is named after Rear Adm. Harold Stout, a decorated World War II destroyer captain, and Adm. Arleigh Burke's most trusted subordinate throughout the war in the Pacific.

For more news from Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/surflant/.

Navy to Commission Littoral Combat Ship Coronado

Navy to Commission Littoral Combat Ship Coronado


The Navy's newest littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Coronado (LCS 4) arrives at Naval Air Station North Island.
SAN DIEGO (March 28, 2014) The Navy's newest littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Coronado (LCS 4) arrives at Naval Air Station North Island in preparation for its commissioning ceremony scheduled April 5. Coronado is the third U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the "Crown City" and is the second littoral combat ship of the Independence variant that features an innovative, trimaran hull. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Chief Mass Communication Specialist Donnie W. Ryan)


From Department of Defense
WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The Navy will commission its newest littoral combat ship, the future USS Coronado (LCS 4), April 5, during a ceremony at Naval Air Station, North Island in Coronado, Calif.

Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson will deliver the ceremony's principal address. Susan Ring Keith, a long-time leader in the San Diego community, will serve as ship's sponsor. The ceremony will be highlighted by a time-honored Navy tradition when Keith gives the first order to "man our ship and bring her to life!"

"The commissioning of USS Coronado is a celebration of the history of the great city of Coronado and its lasting relationship with our Navy and Marine Corps. The sailors aboard LCS 4 will bring this mighty warship to life with their skill and dedication, honoring her namesake and our nation for years to come," said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. "When she sets sail for distant shores, Coronado, and ships like her, will have a vital role maintaining freedom of the seas, and providing naval presence in the right place, all the time."

Cmdr. Shawn Johnston, a native of North Carolina, is the commanding officer of the ship's Gold Crew and will lead the core crew of 40 officers and enlisted personnel. The 2,790-ton Coronado was built by Austal USA Shipbuilding in Mobile, Ala. The ship is 417 feet in length, has a waterline beam of 100 feet, and a navigational draft of 15 feet. The ship uses two gas turbine and two diesel engines to power four steerable water jets to speeds in excess of 40 knots.

Designated LCS 4, Coronado is the fourth littoral combat ship and the second of the Independence variant. Named for Coronado, Calif., it is the third Navy ship to bear the name. USS Coronado (LCS 4) will be outfitted with reconfigurable mission packages and focus on a variety of mission areas including mine countermeasures, surface warfare and anti-submarine warfare.

The first USS Coronado (PF 38) was a patrol frigate and served as a convoy escort during World War II. The subsequent Coronado (AGF 11) was designed as an Austin Class Amphibious Transport Dock (LPD) and was reconfigured to be an Auxiliary Command ship (AGF) in 1980 and subsequently served as the commander, Middle East Force flagship, then the commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet flagship in the Mediterranean, and subsequently the commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet flag ship in the Eastern Pacific Ocean prior to decommissioning in 2006.

Friday, March 28, 2014

CNO Talks LCS Survivability

CNO Talks LCS Survivability

WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert testifies during a posture hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee in support of the proposed budget for Department of the Navy spending in fiscal year 2015 and the Future Years Defense Program. Greenert, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James Amos testified during the posture hearing and answered questions from the committee members about the status of the Navy and Marine Corps and how the budget will affect mission capabilities, personnel and infrastructure. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Peter D. Lawlor/Released)
By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Julianne Metzger, Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs
WASHINGTON (NNS) -- Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert assured members of the Senate Armed Services (SASC) Committee March 27 on the survivability of the littoral combat ship (LCS).

Alongside Secretary Ray Mabus the two defended the need for 52 small surface combatants in front of the SASC and in front of media following their testimony. The secretary emphasized how LCS costs have been driven down and Greenert responded to questions on LCS survivability.

"Survivability is a broader term than we're giving it credit for," said Greenert. "There are three elements to survivability."

The three elements of survivability are: susceptibility, the ability for a ship to defend itself; vulnerability, the effects of an initial casualty on a ship; and lastly recoverability, the ability for a ship to conduct damage control, said the admiral.

Responding to U.S. Sen. Carl Levin and media, Greenert explained that LCS meets or exceeds the same standards of those elements of survivability and recoverability. He said the attributes of survivability in the LCS is comparable to frigates and better than the ships it is designed to replace such as mine countermeasures (MCM) and patrol craft (PC).

"We can work on the susceptibility, and we do have a plan in place," said Greenert. "I want better survivability."

The LCS is an important small surface combatant the Navy needs now and in the future, said Greenert.
Although Greenert supports the overall LCS design, he is open to modifications that would increase both survivability and flexibility of the platform.

"This ship has the ability to grow; it has speed, it has volume and it has capacity," said Greenert.
Despite ongoing LCS criticism, the admiral underlined the necessity of the LCS to fulfill the Navy's small surface combatant count.

"We need small surface combatants," said Greenert. "We need 52."

In responding to more questions about the need for a small surface combatant, Greenert described that the next ship after LCS could look quite different although maybe the same LCS hull. Greenert compared it to the evolution of Hornets and destroyers. He pointed out that the Navy is coming up on a fourth flight Arleigh Burke destroyer which the Navy is very, very, satisfied with.

Another aspect about LCS that was highlighted in the hearing is that LCS is a validated requirement that meets the mission it was designed to do. This point was brought up by Levin. Soon after the hearing the Director of Surface Warfare, Rear Adm. Thomas Rowden, confirmed this with interested media.

"There's no doubt we're continually learning more about how we can best employ the ship as part of the integrated force, but the bottom line is that it meets the mission it was intended to do," said Rowden. "We have to remember that the overarching question when looking at survivability is 'how are we going to operate these ships?' LCS has a validated set of requirements - and it meets them."

For more information from CNO, visit www.navy.mil/CNO and www.navy.mil/local/cno/.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

PRESS RELEASE: U.S. Representative Massie Introduces Bipartisan Milk Freedom Legislation

For Immediate Release Lorenz.Isidro@mail.house.gov
Thursday March 27, 2014 (202) 225-3465
U.S. Representative Massie Introduces Bipartisan Milk Freedom Legislation
Bipartisan Coalition of 20 Lawmakers Introduces Legislation to Improve Consumer Choice and Protect Local Farmers. 

WASHINGTON, DC – Congressman Massie (R–KY), Chellie Pingree (D–ME) and a bipartisan coalition of 18 other lawmakers have introduced legislation to improve consumer food choices and to protect local farmers from federal interference. The two bills – the “Milk Freedom of Act of 2014” and the “Interstate Milk Freedom Act of 2014” – are the first in a series of “food freedom” bills that Rep. Massie plans to introduce this year.

“As a producer of grass-fed beef, I am familiar with some of the difficulties small farmers face when marketing fresh food directly to consumers.  Our bills would make it easier for families to buy wholesome milk directly from farmers by reversing the criminalization of dairy farmers who offer raw milk,” said Rep. Massie. “The federal government should not punish farmers for providing customers the foods they want, and states should be free to set their own laws regulating food safety.”

"Many consumers want to buy fresh, unpasteurized milk and regulations shouldn't get between them and the farmer who wants to sell it,” said Representative Pingree.  “Given how many food scares there have been involving large-scale producers, it just doesn't make sense to spend money cracking down on small, local farmers who are producing natural, raw milk and cheese. The enforcement of raw milk regulations has been overzealous and needs to be reined in."

"As consumer, advocate, and mother, I have spent over a decade navigating a complex legal and regulatory maze to access raw milk and other fresh, local foods,” said Sarah Donovan of the Farm-to-Consumer Foundation. “These bills are an important step toward removing federal barriers between farmers and families."

"Raw milk is the only food banned in interstate commerce," said Pete Kennedy, President of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund. "Congratulations to Representative Massie for starting the process of repealing a regulation that thousands of otherwise law abiding citizens violate every week in this country."


Raw milk is fresh milk that has not been pasteurized, and may contain beneficial nutrients that have not been eliminated by the pasteurization process.  Although Congress has never passed legislation banning raw milk, the federal Food and Drug Administration has used their regulatory authority to prosecute farmers for selling raw milk.

The “Milk Freedom Act of 2014” would provide relief to local farmers, small producers, and others who have been harassed, fined, and in some cases even prosecuted for the “crime” of distributing unpasteurized milk.  This bill would prohibit the federal government from interfering with the interstate traffic of raw milk products.

Likewise, the “Interstate Milk Freedom Act of 2014” would prevent the federal government from interfering with trade of unpasteurized, natural milk or milk products between states where distribution or sale of such products is already legal.

No provision of either bill would preempt or otherwise interfere with any state law.
Massie concluded, “Today, many people are paying more attention to the food they eat, what it contains, and how it is processed.  Raw milk, which has been with us for thousands of years, is making a comeback among these discerning consumers.  Personal choices as basic as ‘what we feed our families’ should not be limited by the federal government.”

Original co-sponsors of the Milk Freedom Act include Reps Chellie Pingree (D-ME), Jared Polis (D-CO), Tom McClintock (R-CA), Scott Rigell (R-VA), Walter Jones (R-NC), Paul Broun (R-GA), Steve Stockman (R-TX), Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), Louie Gohmert (R-TX), and Justin Amash (R-MI). Original co-sponsors of the Interstate Milk Freedom Act of 2014 include Reps Chellie Pingree (D-ME), Jared Polis (D-CO), Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Tom McClintock (R-CA), Scott Rigell (R-VA), Walter Jones (R-NC) , Paul Broun (R-GA), Andy Harris (R-MD), Cynthia Lummis (R-WY), Morgan Griffith (R-VA), Ted Poe (R-TX), Marlin Stutzman (R-IN), Mick Mulvaney (R-SC), Steve Stockman (R-TX), Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), Louie Gohmert (R-TX), Scott Perry (R-PA), and Raul Labrador (R-ID). 
###

Pope Francis Brings Up Pro-Life, Religious Freedom Concerns During Obama Meeting

Pope Francis Brings Up Pro-Life, Religious Freedom Concerns During Obama Meeting

China's new subs to get long-range nuclear missiles for the first time - Washington Times

China's new subs to get long-range nuclear missiles for the first time - Washington Times

China’s Navy Takes Great Leap Forward

China’s Navy Takes Great Leap Forward

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Way Up North: Post #4,000: Is Secession Inevitable?

Way Up North: Post #4,000: Is Secession Inevitable?: This guy thinks so. He presents a thoughtful study based on three types of law. Go there if you wish, and think it over for yourself. Her...

SECNAV Delivers Keynote Address at Jackson Christening

SECNAV Delivers Keynote Address at Jackson Christening

MOBILE, Ala. (March 22, 2014) Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus, left, speaks with Fire Controlman 1st Class Robert Callow after a christening ceremony for the Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Jackson (LCS-6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Arif Patani/Released)
From Secretary of the Navy Public Affairs
MOBILE, Ala. (NNS) -- Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus delivered the keynote address at the christening ceremony of the future USS Jackson (LCS 6) March 22 at Austal in Mobile, Ala.

Dr. Katherine Holmes Cochran, daughter of Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran, sponsors Jackson, the third Austal-constructed littoral combat ship to be christened.

"Kate now becomes an honorary member of the Jackson's first crew," said Mabus. "She will maintain a special relationship with this ship and her Sailors, a special relationship that will be shared by the city of Jackson and her people, and by all the people of Mississippi."

Mabus went on to discuss not only Cochran's role in the future of the ship, but Jackson's future as well.

"When USS Jackson joins the fleet," he said, "it will represent not just America's interests, but also the story of Jackson and Mississippi and her people, around the globe."

Jackson will be a key enabler of the U.S. Navy's ability to maintain a worldwide presence.

"Today, the Pacific and Indian oceans are again a focus in U.S. defense strategy, and littoral combat ships like the Jackson will play a critical role," Mabus said. "She's fast, agile, modular, shallow draft, and will allow us to work in many different ways with our partners."

Mabus also took time during his remarks to commend those who worked so hard to build the Jackson.

"The ship before you is a modern marvel, but so too is this incredible shipyard and its workforce," said Mabus. Nearly 3,000 American craftsmen have made this ship possible, both here in Mobile and all around the country making components of the ship and its systems."

These very systems were featured in another portion of Mabus' remarks.

"This is a completely new type of ship, a new concept," he said. "The weapons systems on Jackson can be traded out to fit whatever mission it is given. Those same systems can be upgraded as technology changes without having to build a new ship or changing anything out but that particular weapons system."

Prior to Cochran breaking a bottle of champagne across the bow of Jackson to officially complete the christening ceremony, Mabus left the crowd in attendance with a final reminder of the Navy's history and tradition.

"Now it is time to christen this incredible new ship so the crew can take it to sea and can defend our nation, just as their predecessors have for 238 years," he said.

For more news from the Secretary of the Navy, visit www.navy.mil/local/secnav or www.facebook.com/SecretaryoftheNavy.

Friday, March 21, 2014

Wisconsin GOP: Mary Burke Talks Jobs Plan... "Offline"

U.S. Navy: Ice Exercise 2014 Kicks Off in the Arctic Ocean; March is Brain Injury Awareness Month

Catholic League News Release: Okay for Teachers to Have Sex in School


FOR RELIGIOUS AND CIVIL RIGHTS

Okay for Teachers to Have Sex in School


March 21, 2014
Bill Donohue comments on a five-judge Manhattan Appellate Division panel that overturned a termination ruling against two lesbians who were caught having sex in a classroom:

In 2009, two tenured women teachers at James Madison High School in Brooklyn went drinking after school, and then returned to attend a student singing contest. Apparently bored, they walked out and went to Room 337. A janitor found them naked from the waist up (one was on her knees) having sex. They were subsequently fired, and after years of appeals, they were reinstated yesterday by a panel of appellate judges.

The judges decided that termination was too stiff a penalty. Indeed, they condemned it for being "shockingly disproportionate." They also commended the teachers for attending the musical competition after school hours, noting that they "were not required to do so." The ruling emphasized that this was "consensual sexual conduct," and that it was not "in and of itself criminal or otherwise improper." (My italics.)

Lesbians. Public school teachers. Tenured. That's a trifecta—hard to beat. Now if two priests were caught having sex in a classroom, and were given the green light by church authorities, it would be the lead story on the national evening news. But because of the trifecta conditions cited, this is nothing more than a passing local story.

Phone: 212-371-3191
E-mail: pr@catholicleague.org

Thursday, March 20, 2014

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

EAST CHINA SEA (March 18, 2014) An MV-22 aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced) lands on the deck of the forward-deployed amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6). Bonhomme Richard is the flagship of the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group and is conducting a certification exercise with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) and Commander Amphibious Squadron Eleven in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Navy Photo by Lt. Russell Wolfkiel/Released)

George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group Enters 5th Fleet

George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group Enters 5th Fleet
By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Shaun Griffin, USS George H.W. Bush Public Affairs
RED SEA (NNS) -- More than 5,000 Sailors serving in the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) arrived in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) following a routine transit through the Suez Canal, March 19.

While in the 5th Fleet AOR, CSG 2 and its accompanying units will continue to provide a wide range of flexible capabilities in theater security cooperation and maritime security operations.

Commanded by Rear Adm. DeWolfe Miller, GHWB CSG 2 is comprised of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Carrier Air Wing 8, Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), and guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80).

"Recent operations in the 6th Fleet AOR coupled with a lot of hard work and training over the last year has prepared us well" said Miller. "Our presence here will help maintain stability, security and safety in the region."

GHWB CSG 2 is deployed as part of the ongoing rotation of forward-deployed forces to support maritime security operations and operate in international waters across the globe, along with other coalition maritime forces. The strike group is prepared to conduct a variety of missions, including forward naval presence, maritime security operations, and crisis response and theater security cooperation.

"We're ready to take the watch," added Miller. "Harry S. Truman has done a remarkable job, and we're ready to execute a seamless transition."

USS Truxtun remains in the Black Sea conducting theater security cooperation activities with NATO allies and will join the strike group after its operations there are complete.

NAVCENT is responsible for approximately 2.5 million square miles of area including the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, North Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the Red Sea. NAVCENT's mission is to conduct maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts, and strengthen partner nations' maritime capabilities in order to promote security and stability in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility.

For more news from USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), visit www.navy.mil/local/cvn77/.

Reporter: WH Press Secretary Gets Questions from Reporters Before Press Briefing | The Weekly Standard

Reporter: WH Press Secretary Gets Questions from Reporters Before Press Briefing | The Weekly Standard

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Founding Fathers Quote

If tyranny & oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.

James Madison

USS Truxtun Arrives in Varna, Bulgaria

USS Truxtun Arrives in Varna, Bulgaria
From Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet Public Affairs
VARNA, Bulgaria (NNS) -- Guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103) arrived in Bulgaria for a port visit, March 13.

Truxtun's stay in the Black Sea will allow the ship to host an exercise planning conference with NATO allies March 15. The conference will focus on a multilateral naval exercise in the spirit of reassuring allies.

"We are certainly excited to participate in every joint exercise we are afforded," said Cmdr. Andrew Biehn, Truxtun's commanding officer. "We train for months at home and every opportunity we get to hone these skills with our allies is incredibly valuable."

The exercise will take place in the Black Sea and is designed to improve interoperability, increase readiness and develop professional and personal relationships between the United States and its allies.

Truxtun's presence in the Black Sea also demonstrates the United States' commitment to working closely with allies to enhance maritime security and stability, readiness, and naval capability. Interoperability at sea is a cornerstone of NATO's military strength and allows U.S. and allied forces the capability to provide the right presence in the right place at the right time.
Truxtun is currently on a scheduled deployment as a component of Carrier Strike Group 2, centered on the USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77).

U.S. 6th Fleet, headquartered in Naples, Italy, conducts a full range of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation missions in concert with coalition, joint, interagency, and other parties in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa.

For more news from Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/naveur/.