Saturday, October 26, 2013

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

ARABIAN GULF (Oct. 22, 2013) Aviation Boatswain's Mate 2nd Class Austin Moore directs an AV-8B Harrier II from the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit (13th MEU) before it takes off from the flight deck aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4). Boxer is the flagship for the Boxer Amphibious Ready Group and, with the embarked 13th MEU, is deployed in support of maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brian Jeffries/Released)

Friday, October 25, 2013

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

PORTSMOUTH, Va. (Oct. 24, 2013) The Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarine USS West Virginia (SSBN 736) departs Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., following an engineering refueling overhaul. West Virginia is permanently homeported in King's Bay, Ga. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication 2nd Class Ernest R. Scott/Released)

Woman Forced To Strip And Serve Jail Time For Overdue Ticket « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

Woman Forced To Strip And Serve Jail Time For Overdue Ticket « CBS Dallas / Fort Worth

Thursday, October 24, 2013

USS Denver Holds Change of Command

USS Denver Holds Change of Command

By Ens. Jonathan Peterson, USS Denver Public Affairs
SASEBO, Japan (NNS) -- USS Denver (LPD 9) held a change of command ceremony aboard the ship Oct. 24 while in its homeport of Sasebo.

Capt. Michael Donnelly relieved Capt. Kevin P. Lenox as commanding officer, becoming the 31st commanding officer of Denver since the ship's commissioning in 1968.

"I am extremely humbled to have the opportunity to lead Denver through the opportunities and challenges ahead," said Donnelly. "As part of America's forward deployed forces, Denver and her crew-with the U.S. Marine Corps-play a unique role in maintaining a constant national presence with demonstrated military capability and seamless interoperability with our regional allies. She has over 45 years of bold legacy, with a current crew that has achieved a multitude of recent accomplishments. I look forward to continuing this great tradition with Denver."

Capt. Michael "Buzz" Donnelly is a native of Kent Island, Md. In 1989, he graduated with a bachelor of mechanical engineering degree from Villanova University and was commissioned via the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC). He holds a master of arts in national security studies and strategic affairs from the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

The ceremony brought to a close a successful 12-month command tour for Lenox. During that time Denver completed a seven-month maintenance availability period and steamed to Okinawa, the coast of Australia, and Timor-Leste (East Timor) in support of joint-force exercises and operations with the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Readiness Group and the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU). Denver conducted exercise Koolendong, the 31st MEU's certification exercise (CERTEX), and Talisman Saber 2013.

"I am incredibly proud of the success of this crew," said Lenox. "Every challenge [the crew] faced on this patrol, from material challenges to long hours to schedule uncertainty; they met each with resolve and high spirits. It's humbling to have led such a capable crew and I'm proud I brought every single one of them home to Sasebo after our successes this year."

Lenox's next assignment will be as Director, Missile Warning Center at the USSTRATCOM Combat Operation Center in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Denver reports to Commander, Amphibious Force 7th Fleet, Rear Adm. Hugh D. Wetherald and is part of the Bonhomme Richard ARG.

For more news from Commander, Amphibious Force, U.S. 7th Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/ctf76/.

Monday, October 21, 2013

Cruz: No surrender - The Hill - covering Congress, Politics, Political Campaigns and Capitol Hill | TheHill.com

Cruz: No surrender - The Hill - covering Congress, Politics, Political Campaigns and Capitol Hill | TheHill.com

How One IDF Commander Turned Back a Syrian Column in the Yom Kippur War

How One IDF Commander Turned Back a Syrian Column in the Yom Kippur War

With just one tank, Captain Zvika Greengold withstood the might of the Syrian military. As the battle around him raged, he moved in and out of the darkness, firing at Syrian forces while remaining undetected. He persisted heroically for hours, throwing himself at the enemy in the face of almost certain death.

On October 6, 1973 – the first day of the Yom Kippur War – the Syrian military bombarded Israel’s northern border. At exactly 2:00 pm, its air force and artillery pounded IDF positions in the Golan Heights in coordination with an Egyptian strike in the Sinai Peninsula. Hours later, Syrian tanks and troops crossed the border and invaded Israeli territory. The IDF soldiers, suffering tremendous losses, scrambled to stop the Syrian onslaught.
 
Israeli_Tank_Battles_Egyptian_Forces_in_the_Sinai_Desert_-_Flickr_-_Israel_Defense_Forces

Meanwhile, Captain Zvi “Zvika” Greengold, a 21-year-old tank commander, frantically left his home on a kibbutz near Haifa. Before the war, he had been granted two weeks’ leave before beginning a course for commanders. When he learned of the Syrian attack, he made his way northward to the Golan, where IDF forces were growing increasingly outnumbered.
 
In the late afternoon, Cpt. Greengold reached Nafah – an IDF command center in the Golan’s southern sector. Determined to join soldiers in the battlefield, he took command of two tanks and assembled scratch crews to run them.  He made contact with troops in the southern sector and advanced toward them, identifying his tanks over radio as ‘the Zvika Force.’ With night falling, he set out along the Tapline Route – a road in the Golan Heights used by Syrian forces to enter Israeli territory.
 
Cpt. Zvi "Zvika" Greengold
Cpt. Zvi “Zvika” Greengold – One against many

Moments later, Cpt. Greengold discovered a company of Syrian tanks moving toward Nafah. With two tanks, he faced slim chances of success against the Syrian forces, but he was determined to protect the Israeli command center. In a heroic act, he began to coordinate an attack on the company. For hours, he persisted with extraordinary bravery, throwing himself at the enemy in the face of almost certain death.
 
Battle on the Tapline Route
 
Cpt. Greengold’s crew took partial cover beside the road and waited for the Syrian tanks to approach. When he spotted the first Syrian tank, he rapidly opened fire. The blast from his vehicle hit the Syrian tank and ignited it, generating a shock that destroyed his own radio communications. Left unable to communicate, he jumped out of his vehicle and ran to the second tank in the heat of battle.
 
Cpt. Greengold traded places with the second tank’s commander and ordered him to follow his lead. But as the two vehicles moved down the road, the other tank soon lost its direction in the darkness. With no way to locate the other half of his force, Cpt. Greengold realized that he would need to face the remaining Syrian tanks alone.
 
Map of Syrian Invasion October 6 1973

Read more at: http://www.idfblog.com/2013/10/21/one-idf-commander-turned-back-syrian-column-yom-kippur-war/#more-30433

U.S. Navy: Six Female Officers to Integrate into Fast Attack Submarines