Friday, December 20, 2013

Missouri Welcomed Home after Maiden Deployment

Missouri Welcomed Home after Maiden Deployment


USS Missouri (SSN 780) Ship Crest
By Lt. Timothy Hawkins, Submarine Group 2 Public Affairs
GROTON, Conn. (NNS) -- A few hundred families, friends and Navy personnel welcomed home USS Missouri (SSN 780) at Naval Submarine Base New London, Dec. 20, after the Virginia-class attack submarine completed its first overseas deployment.

Missouri was one of eight East Coast-based attack submarines that departed in 2013 for a regularly scheduled six-month cruise.

"These submarines all performed superbly on mission," said Rear Adm. Ken Perry, the commander responsible for attack subs in Groton and Norfolk, Va. "I'm proud of our teammates and shipmates at Submarine Group 2 and the many organizations that support our efforts to deliver ready submarines."

Led by Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Luckett, Missouri's crew of more than 130 Sailors returned home just in time for the holidays.

"Missouri's performance on her inaugural deployment was exemplary, an accomplishment made even more impressive considering over 70 percent of the crew was experiencing deployment for the first time," said Luckett.

Crew members arrived with teddy bears, flowers, and candy canes for waiting loved ones. However, families weren't looking for the extra goodies. They were simply thrilled to have the Sailors home safely.

"Myself, the ombudsman and the wives are just really excited to welcome them home," said Natasha Luckett, the commanding officer's wife. "I'm extremely proud of my husband and the crew."

The submarine departed Groton and headed to the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations June 18. It made port calls to Haakonsvern, Norway; Faslane, Scotland; and Portsmouth, England.

Missouri's ombudsman Cheryl Gaydos recalled how she felt when the submarine left Groton.

"I did tear up when the boat left," she said. "We all felt a bit anxious about how we were going to keep things afloat here at home and keep ourselves sane. I knew it was going to be hard."

As days became weeks and weeks became months, Gaydos said she filled her time with house chores, paying bills, working, and taking care of her two dogs - a 25-pound corgi and 65-pound hound. She also focused on staying strong for other families.

"A lot of us really became close friends during this whole thing and helped each other. Missouri crewmembers are coming home to stronger wives," she said.

Three babies were born while their fathers were at sea, including one born just five days before Missouri returned.

Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Arrell Cavanaugh, a 22-year-old crewmember from Michigan, met his baby girl Ea Christine Cavanaugh for the first time. Ea was born Dec. 15 at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital in New London weighing 7 pounds, 8 ounces.

"I'm so excited because this is his little girl," said Genevieve Cavanaugh, the proud mother and wife. "It was hard for my husband because he wasn't there for the birth, but I'm just so excited to have him home."

The couple had always suspected Genevieve would one day give birth while her husband was deployed. When they married in 2010, they immediately settled on names for kids they planned to have in the future.

Ea is their second child. They also have a 16-month-old son who has his dad's first name.

Three Submarine Group 2 boats remain on deployment during the holidays, including USS Scranton (SSN 756) based in Norfolk, as well as USS Virginia (SSN 774) and USS San Juan (SSN 751) from Groton.

Perry said these submarines "remain on station standing the watch so that we can enjoy a peaceful and safe holiday here back home in the States."

For more news from Commander Submarine Group 2, visit www.navy.mil/local/Subgru2/.

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

GULF OF ADEN (Nov. 22, 2013) Sailors assigned to the visit, board, search and seizure team from the guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) return to Mason. Mason is deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Rob Aylward/Released)

Release: Governor Signs Mursau Bill into Law


December 20, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:     Rep. Jeff Mursau (888) 534-0036 http://Mursau.Assembly.Wisconsin.Gov


Madison … Governor Scott Walker has signed Representative Jeff Mursau’s (R – Crivitz) bill to streamline municipal shoreland zoning in Wisconsin. The law will allow cities and villages to have one zoning law instead of a patchwork of laws when they annex land from towns without their own zoning.

“I appreciate Governor Walker’s support for this law,” Mursau said. “It was ridiculous to expect cities and villages to implement more than one shoreland zoning standard.”

The law narrows regulations to ensure they apply only to natural water bodies. Previously cities and villages had to regulate land adjacent to some drainage ditches and retention ponds the same as they did lakes, streams and rivers.
Senator Tom Tiffany (R – Hazelhurst) was the lead author in the Wisconsin State Senate.

-30-

PCU Milwaukee Conducts Mast-Stepping Ceremony

PCU Milwaukee Conducts Mast-Stepping Ceremony

The littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Milwaukee (LCS 5) slides into the Menominee River during a christening ceremony.
MARINETTE, Wis. (Dec. 18, 2013) The littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Milwaukee (LCS 5) slides into the Menominee River during a christening ceremony at the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin/Released)

From Pre-Commissioning Unit Milwaukee Public Affairs
MILWAUKEE (NNS) -- The crews of the Navy's newest littoral combat ship, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Milwaukee (LCS 5), conducted a mast-stepping ceremony at the Marinette Marine Corporation in Marinette, Wis., Dec. 18.

Mast-stepping, an ancient Greek and Roman practice of putting coins at the base of a mast of a ship under construction has continued throughout history.

In current naval tradition, coins and other items that highlight the heritage of the ship are placed in a container and welded into the mast.

Sylvia M. Panetta, the ship's sponsor, joined the ship's prospective commanding officers, Cmdr. Michael Brasseur (LCS Crew 111) and Cmdr. Kendall Bridgewater (LCS Crew 104), and distinguished guests from the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and Marinette, Wis., placing coins and other artifacts representing the heritage of the ship and namesake city into the container.

Included in the container are five coins from the first 5 LCS ships built, five coins representing the military history of Milwaukee, Mayor Tom Barrett's Milwaukee Mayors office coin, five coins representing the city's support of Wisconsin's Armed Forces, and five nickels representing the year of the ship's christening and the founding year the Institute that was established by the Panetta family.

Milwaukee cultural artifacts included a capsule of water from Lake Michigan and San Diego, representing the first homeport and the first body of water the USS Milwaukee will be received in, a Milwaukee Art Museum pin, representing the foundation and strength of the city of Milwaukee, a Fonzi doll jacket from Happy Days, representing the significance in pop culture of the city of Milwaukee, and San Diego Harley Davidson bells, representing safe travels from one rider to another.

The Marinette Marine Corporation sealed the mast-stepping container. It will be welded into the ship's mast at a later date.

For more news from Naval Surface Forces, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnsp/.

MCPON & SMMC Holiday Message 2013

U.S. Navy: Headlines for Friday, Dec. 20, 2013

Thursday, December 19, 2013

USS Freedom Set to Complete Maiden Deployment | Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet

USS Freedom Set to Complete Maiden Deployment | Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet


In this file photo, USS Freedom (LCS 1) prepares to enter the channel of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Dec. 13 for a port visit prior to proceeding home to San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Johans Chavarro)

SAN DIEGO - The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is scheduled to return to its homeport of San Diego Dec. 23 following the completion of its maiden deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR).

Deployed since March 1 with her "Gold Crew", known formally as Crew 102, the ship took part in a number of theater security cooperation and maritime presence operations with partner nations in the region. In August, Crew 102 swapped with the ship's "Blue Crew" (Crew 101), which completed the deployment and will bring the ship back.

Both crews deployed with a ship's company of 53 Sailors, plus embarked air and mission detachments.

See more at: http://www.cpf.navy.mil/news.aspx/010212

LCSs of both types hit the water

LCSs of both types hit the water

U.S. Navy: Headlines for Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013

Governor Scott Walker Attends Christening and Launch of USS Milwaukee, Proclaims “USS Milwaukee Day"

Governor Scott Walker Attends Christening and Launch of USS Milwaukee, Proclaims “USS Milwaukee Day

Office of the Governor, Scott Walker - Press Release

Governor Scott Walker Attends Christening and Launch of USS Milwaukee, Proclaims “USS Milwaukee Day"

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - Press Release


Marinette – Governor Scott Walker today joined Marinette Marine Corporation, Fincantieri Marine Group, Lockheed Martin Littoral Ships and Systems, U.S. Navy officers, and local officials to celebrate the christening and launching of the USS Milwaukee, a littoral combat ship (LCS).
“This beautiful ship, honoring our largest city, showcases the exemplary workmanship of Marinette Marine and symbolizes a commitment to national security,” Governor Walker said.  “This striking vessel is also an example of the value of the skilled workers who helped build it, including welders, pipe fitters, electricians, engineers, and information technology workers.  I want to thank Fincantieri Marine Group, for its $100 million investment in Northeast Wisconsin, and also Marinette Marine for its commitment and belief in Wisconsin, our workforce, and our efforts to help meet demands for trained, skilled workers.”
Governor Walker also thanked Lockheed Martin, the contractor for the LCS program, as well as Northeast Wisconsin Technical College for working with the company to train skilled workers. 
The USS Milwaukee is part of a new breed of U.S. Navy combat ships designed for littoral, or coastal, missions.  With a crew of about 40, they can operate in shallow water and maneuver at high speeds of up to 45 knots. 
Developing Our Workforce:  Governor Walker’s 2013-15 budget invests more than $100 million in workforce development, aimed at equipping workers with the skills they need to find in-demand jobs, like those available at Marinette Marine.  The budget includes increased funding and targeted investments in the Wisconsin Technical College System and traditional K-12 education.  In addition, the Wisconsin Fast Forward initiative invests $15 million in worker training grants awarded by the new Office of Skills Development, including the creation of a new Labor Market Information System.  Also, Governor Walker’s Worker Training package, announced this fall, invests $8.5 million in new state funds and secures an additional $14 million in new federal funds for vocational rehabilitation programs.
About Marinette Marine:  Marinette Marine Corporation was founded in 1942 to meet America's growing demand for naval construction and has grown into a world-class shipbuilder, having designed and built more than 1,500 vessels and employing 1,400 and growing.  The company is internationally recognized for innovative and highly efficient, modular, subassembly and assembly-line manufacturing techniques, allowing Marinette to build some of the most technologically advanced vessels in the world. 
###

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

FOX 11 WLUK-TV: LCS MILWAUKEE LAUNCHED

Marinette,WI And The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Program



h/t: madison.com

DR:  There is no denying the huge impact the LCS program is providing in Marinette County, WI.  It also delivers a level of pride and honor to be involved in such a critical component of our nation's security.  The jobs provided at Marinette Marine Corp. are of immense economic value to an area without many high paying jobs.

Future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5) Successfully Christened And Launched In Marinette, WI

The littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Milwaukee (LCS 5) slides into Lake Michigan during a christening ceremony.
MARINETTE, Wis. (Dec. 18, 2013) The littoral combat ship Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Milwaukee (LCS 5) slides into Lake Michigan during a christening ceremony at the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin/Released)
Today, Lockheed Martin and Marinette Marine Corp. successfully launched the third Freedom Class vessel, the USS Milwaukee.  There is a lot of community pride that the Freedom Class is built in Northeast WI.  The USS Milwaukee will be commissioned in Milwaukee, WI, in May or June, 2015.

Class and Type:  Freedom-class littoral combat ship
Displacement:  3,000 metric tons (3,000 t) (full load)
Length:  378 feet (115 m)
Beam:  57.4 feet (17.5 m)
Draft:  12.8 feet (3.9 m)
Installed Power:  Electrical: 4 Isotta Fraschini V1708 diesel engines, Hitzinger generator units, 800 kW each
Propulsion:  2 Rolls-Royce MT30 36 MW gas turbines, 2 Colt-Pielstick diesel engines, 4 Rolls-Royce waterjets
Speed:  47 knots (87 km/h; 54 mph) (sea state 3)
Range:  3,500 nmi (6,500 km; 4,000 mi) at 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph)
Endurance:  21 days (336 hours)
Boats and Landing Craft:  11 metres (36 ft) RHIB, 40 ft (12 m) high-speed boats
15 to 50 core crew, 75 with mission crew (Blue and Gold crews)
Sensors and Processing Systems:  EADS TRS-3D 3D air and surface search radar
Lockheed Martin COMBATSS-21 combat management system
AN/SQR-20 Multi-Function Towed Array (As part of ASW mission module)
Electronic Warfare and Decoys:  Argon ST WBR-2000 ESM system
Terma A/S SKWS decoy system
Armament:  1x BAE Systems Mk 110 57 mm gun, 400 rounds in turret and two ready service magazines with 240 rounds each.
4x .50-cal machine guns
2x Mk44 Bushmaster II 30mm guns
21x RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile Surface-to-Air Missiles
45 NLOS missiles (As part of ASuW mission module)
Aircraft Carried:  2x MH-60R/S SeahawkMQ-8 Fire Scout

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) passes by Mukilteo Lighthouse Park on its way to homeport at Naval Station Everett.
EVERETT, Wash. (Dec. 16, 2013) The aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) passes by Mukilteo Lighthouse Park on its way to homeport at Naval Station Everett. Nimitz concluded an extended deployment to the western Pacific, U.S. Central Command and U.S. European Command areas of responsibility supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and maritime security operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Lockwood/Released)

CNO Admiral Jonathan Greenert and Mrs. Greenert 2013 Holiday Message

EU Naval Force Warship ESPS Tornado Conducts Training with Tanzanian Navy During Port Visit to Dar Es Salaam | Eunavfor

EU Naval Force Warship ESPS Tornado Conducts Training with Tanzanian Navy During Port Visit to Dar Es Salaam | Eunavfor

Rear Adm. Franken Engages with Citizens of Milwaukee

Rear Adm. Franken Engages with Citizens of Milwaukee


By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jesse Dick, Navy Office of Community Outreach Public Affairs
MILWAUKEE, Wis. (NNS) -- Americans in Wisconsin have a better understanding of the Navy and its role in preserving the nation's security and prosperity after one day of high-level engagements, Dec. 17.

Rear Adm. Michael Franken, chief of legislative affairs for the Navy, spent one day in Milwaukee meeting with government officials, civic groups, and reporters.

His itinerary included a meeting with Commissioner Rocky Marcoux, a luncheon and speaking engagement with the FUEL Milwaukee organization, an appearance on the ABC affiliate morning show, and print news interviews with the Journal Sentinel and Milwaukee Business Journal.

"The outreach activities offered a great opportunity to represent and speak about the Navy to the Milwaukee public," said Franken. "To be able to give everyone here an appreciation of how their sons and daughters are supporting the nation and its national security is vitally important."

Executive engagement visits are between senior Navy leaders and their government, civic, education and corporate counterparts and have become a focus of effort in recent years as the Navy works to increase understanding of the Navy's mission and role in America's national security strategy. The effort is particularly critical in areas of the country which do not enjoy a significant Navy presence.

Rear Adm. Franken visited Milwaukee as part of his trip to Marinette, Wis., for the christening of the USS Milwaukee (LCS 5) on Dec. 18.

"The visit also gave me the opportunity to discuss the Wisconsin-based Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard LCS construction program," Franken said. "Tomorrow brings us another milestone in that program by christening USS Milwaukee (LCS 5). The Wisconsin/Navy LCS program continues to bring enhanced capability to the Navy with its multi-platform flexibility and its speed and agility capability."

The LCS platforms enable the Navy to provide capable, cost-effective solutions to gain, sustain, and exploit littoral maritime supremacy.

"I certainly enjoyed engaging with the people of Milwaukee today. They are keenly interested in the Navy programs that directly impact their state economically and the Wisconsin Sailors currently serving around the world who are representing the United State as ambassadors," said Franken. "I'm so proud of having been a part of this organization for the past 33 years."

Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard and the Austal USA shipyard build different versions of the littoral combat ship.

For more news from Navy Office of Community Outreach (NAVCO), visit www.navy.mil/local/navco/.

USS Michigan Gold Changes Command

USS Michigan Gold Changes Command


By Chief Mass Communication Specialist (SW/AW) Ahron Arendes, Submarine Group 9 Public Affairs
BANGOR, Wash. (NNS) -- The Gold Crew of guided-missile submarine USS Michigan (SSGN 727) welcomed a new commanding officer as Capt. Benjamin Pearson relieved Capt. Robert James during a ceremony at the Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor Chapel, Dec. 17.

James, who assumed command of the Gold Crew in Nov. 2011, participated in overseas exercises with foreign militaries and took the ship from a dry dock maintenance period to once again being a forward-deployed asset.

"I think we can all learn something about the institution of command from commanders like Bob James," said Capt. Charles Logan, commander of Submarine Squadron 19. I would ask officers that are in their first command tour to consider the path taken by Bob and Ben both for the significant challenge of this job as an SSGN CO, but also the sheer joy of serving with a crew like Michigan Gold and the significant satisfaction attained by completing such a challenging tour filled with achievement."

James spoke of Michigan Gold Crew's successes and memorable moments during his command tour.

"It is the crew that deserves all of the credit," said James. "Something I recognized way back when I started this path was that for me to be successful I needed to build teams and build up people so they are successful. Thereby I will be successful, and I can say that you all definitely fulfilled that. You are the reason I am successful."

As his last official act as CO James meritoriously advanced two of his Sailors under the command advancement program (CAP), one to petty officer 1st class and the other to petty officer 2nd class.

"I've learned a lot of great things from the captain and after almost 13 years of this, I can't say I've worked for a better one," said the newly advanced Machinist's Mate 1st Class Vernon Deschene. "Being capped took me by surprise. There were a lot of really deserving people and I'm just very honored, excited, and happy. I thank Captain James for everything he has done, and I wish him the best of luck."

Pearson comes to Michigan Gold from the Chief of Naval Operations staff, where he served as Branch Head for Plans, Liaison, and Assessment for the Director of Undersea Warfare.

"I am excited to take over as your commanding officer," said Pearson to his crew. "We have an amazing ship that provides the nation with a huge arsenal of weapons at our disposal. We owe it to our country to be ready when needed and my goal is to ensure we are in fighting shape as we complete our training cycle and deploy to the Western Pacific."

SSGNs provide the Navy with an unprecedented combination of strike and special operation mission capabilities within a stealthy, clandestine platform. Armed with tactical missiles and equipped with superior communications capabilities, SSGNs are capable of directly support dozens of Special Operation Forces.

For more news from Commander, Submarine Group 9, visit www.navy.mil/local/csg9/.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Robert E. Lee and 'Stonewall' Jackson tributes face Army War College removal - Washington Times

Robert E. Lee and 'Stonewall' Jackson tributes face Army War College removal - Washington Times

Spaceflight Now | Breaking News | China's lunar rover seen in images from the moon

Spaceflight Now | Breaking News | China's lunar rover seen in images from the moon

Coast Guard, partner agencies respond to ferry grounding near Battery Island, NC


News Release

Coast Guard, partner agencies respond to ferry grounding near Battery Island, NC

PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard and partner agencies are responding to a report of multiple injuries after the Bald Head Island Ferry Adventure ran aground Tuesday in the vicinity of Battery Island near Southport, N.C.

The crew of the Adventure, a 64-foot ferry, contacted Coast Guard Station Oak Island watchstanders via VHF-FM channel 16 at approximately 9 a.m., reporting they ran aground and passengers aboard were in need of medical assistance.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders issued a marine assistance request broadcast and dispatched crews aboard a 47-foot Motor Life Boat and a 25-foot Response Boat - Small from Coast Guard Station Oak Island and diverted the Coast Guard Cutter Bayberry to assist.

The crew of the Bayberry used their shallow water skiff to medevac 14 passengers from the Adventure and transfer them to the 47-foot MLB and the 25-foot RB-S.  The crews aboard the two rescue boats then took the injured passengers to Deep Point Marina.

Partner agencies from Bald Head Island, Towboat US and the Brunswick Sherriff's department helped recover the non-injured passengers and transferred them to the Bald Head Island Ferry Ranger.

The media are invited to attend a press conference at 12:30 p.m. located at the Deep Point Marina at 1301 Ferry Rd. SE, Southport, NC 28461.

For more information contact Lt. Lane Munroe at 541-292-2272.
###
Date: Dec 17, 2013
Office: (757) 398-6272

Navy Commemorates 180th Anniversary of Enlisted Insignia

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 13, 2013) The U.S. Navy's first littoral combat ship, USS Freedom (LCS 1), transits the waters of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Freedom's maiden proof-of-concept deployment, a 9-month assignment forward-operating from Singapore, is also the first ever for a LCS and the ship is scheduled to return to its San Diego homeport later this month. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean Furey/Released)

Monday, December 16, 2013

Coast Guard Cutter Shackle and Tackle break ice on the Penobscot River

China Defense Blog: Are we looking at a new variant of the Yuan class ...

China Defense Blog: Are we looking at a new variant of the Yuan class ...: A series of photos surfaced recently of a new diesel-electric submarine under construction at the Wuhan shipyard and quickly caused a stir a...

Navy to Christen Littoral Combat Ship Milwaukee

Navy to Christen Littoral Combat Ship Milwaukee


From Department of Defense Public Affairs
WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The Navy will christen its newest littoral combat ship, the future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5) in a ceremony at the Marinette Marine Corporation shipyard in Marinette, Wis., Dec. 18 at 1:15 p.m. CST.

Sylvia Panetta, wife of former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, will serve as the ship's sponsor. Panetta will officially christen the ship Milwaukee.

Milwaukee was named in honor of the largest city in the state of Wisconsin and will be the fifth to bear the city's name.

"Milwaukee's christening serves as a tribute to this great American city, but also to the hard working people of Wisconsin and our nation's entire industrial base," said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. "LCS is one of our most important platforms and represents the future of the Navy. Our commitment to this program remains as steadfast as that of those who helped build this great ship."

Littoral combat ships are fast, agile surface combatants optimized for warfighting in the highly trafficked near-shore regions of the world against asymmetric "anti-access" threats. Through its innovative design, LCS can be reconfigured for surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and mine countermeasures. This versatility enables Navy to provide warfighters with the most capable, cost-effective solutions to gain, sustain, and exploit littoral maritime supremacy.

The launch and christening of LCS 5, and the recent launch of LCS 6 from the Austal USA shipyard together mark a milestone for the littoral combat ship program. These are the first two littoral combat ships built from start to finish using serial production processes. Serial production is important because it allows the Navy to reap benefits such as improved cost structure per vessel and reduced construction time.

The Navy has incorporated much of the knowledge gained in the build, test and operation of LCS 1 and LCS 2, the lead ships of the class, into follow-on ships.

Milwaukee will be 388 feet in length and equipped with four axial-flow waterjet engines, which will improve performance and move nearly half a million gallons of seawater per minute which will propel the ship to speeds in excess of 40 knots.

The first USS Milwaukee was a double-turret ironclad river monitor built for Civil War service. A St. Louis-class cruiser, the second USS Milwaukee (C-21) was lost in 1916 while attempting to free a submarine that had run aground. The third USS Milwaukee (CL-5) was an Omaha-class light cruiser, which served through World War II in the Atlantic, and the fourth USS Milwaukee (AOR 2), a Wichita-class replenishment oiler, was decommissioned in 1994.

For more information on the littoral combat ship, visit http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4200&tid=1650&ct=4.

USS Cowpens: Why China forced a confrontation at sea with US Navy

USS Cowpens: Why China forced a confrontation at sea with US Navy

Nimitz Carrier Strike Group Returns from Deployment

U.S. Navy: Navy Beats Army 34-7

U.S. Navy Photo of the Day

The U.S. Navy's first littoral combat ship, USS Freedom (LCS 1), moors at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 13, 2013) Seaman Exammanuel Williams, stationed aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70) secures a mooring line for the U.S. Navy's first littoral combat ship, USS Freedom (LCS 1), on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Freedom's maiden proof-of-concept deployment, a 9-month assignment forward-operating from Singapore, is also the first ever for a LCS and the ship is scheduled to return to its San Diego homeport later this month. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean Furey/Released)

PHOTOS: Israeli Army on Storm Duty - Israel Today | Israel News

PHOTOS: Israeli Army on Storm Duty - Israel Today | Israel News

Freedom's Maiden Deployment Nears End, Changes Hands at Pearl Harbor

Freedom's Maiden Deployment Nears End, Changes Hands at Pearl Harbor

The U.S. Navy's first littoral combat ship, USS Freedom (LCS 1), transits the waters of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.
PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 13, 2013) The U.S. Navy's first littoral combat ship, USS Freedom (LCS 1), transits the waters of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. Freedom's maiden proof-of-concept deployment, a 9-month assignment forward-operating from Singapore, is also the first ever for a LCS and the ship is scheduled to return to its San Diego homeport later this month. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean Furey/Released)

By US Pacific Fleet Public Affairs
PEARL HARBOR (NNS) -- Cmdr. Roger D. Heinken assumed command of USS Freedom (LCS 1), the U.S. Navy's first Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), during a change of command at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Dec 15.

Heinken relieved Cmdr. Patrick C. Thien as Freedom's "Crew 101" commanding officer as the ship nears completion of her maiden deployment - a nine-month assignment forward-operating from Singapore.

Thien noted the ship's long list of accomplishments and thanked and the crew for their hard work during his three and a half year tour.

"This has been a rewarding tour ... but not rewarding for all the things we accomplished," Thien said. "It has been rewarding because I have had the opportunity and honor to work with, and lead, some of the best Sailors in the Navy."

Capt. Randy Garner, commodore, LCS Squadron One, commended Thien on his leadership and the crew's performance on this proof-of-concept deployment.

"We set out to deploy USS Freedom to the Western Pacific ... to review ship capabilities against the demands in an operating theater, to execute our concept of operations and to find out how you, the crew of USS Freedom, execute given the tools available to you," Garner said. "You have performed superbly given every challenge and highlighted to leadership what can be done with this ship, this crew and in a very dynamic theater of operations."

Freedom's maiden deployment is also the first ever for LCS - a platform that reflects changes in ship operational requirements and in the way the Navy deals with fiscal realities. LCS is designed to operate in shallow waters and features reconfigurable payloads for various missions, and is built in a way that realizes significant cost savings over previous ship classes.

Cmdr. Heinken said he is honored by the opportunity to command the first-of-class ship.

"This is the finest crew that's ever set foot on a warship,' Heinken said. "I'm proud and honored to serve you and be part of the crew 101 family."

USS Freedom's first rotational deployment to Southeast Asia began March 1, when the ship departed San Diego and commenced a Pacific Ocean transit that included port visits in Hawaii, Guam and Manila. Freedom worked out of Singapore, using it as a logistics and maintenance hub between April 18 and Nov. 16, during which she participated in the International Maritime Defence Exhibition (IMDEX), three phases of the bilateral naval exercise Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) with Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei, and the multinational exercise Southeast Asia Cooperation and Training (SEACAT). During port visits, Freedom hosted thousands visitors throughout Southeast Asia.


For more news from Pacific Fleet, visit www.navy.mil/local/cpf/.

Sunday, December 15, 2013

How the Mig-31 repelled the SR-71 Blackbird from Soviet skies

How the Mig-31 repelled the SR-71 Blackbird from Soviet skies

Future USS Jackson (LCS 6) Launches, Marks Production Milestone

Future USS Jackson (LCS 6) Launches, Marks Production Milestone


An artist rendering of the littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS 6).
WASHINGTON (Oct. 4, 2011) An artist rendering of the littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS 6). (U.S. Navy photo illustration by Jay M. Chu/Released)

By Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships (PEO LCS) Public Affairs
MOBILE, Ala. (NNS) -- The future USS Jackson (LCS 6) launched from the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Ala., Dec. 14, marking an important production milestone for the littoral combat ship program.

Jackson joins the future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5), which will launch from the Marinette Marine Corp. yard in Wisconsin next week.

These ships are the first vessels procured under the block buy contract awarded in 2010 and represent the true beginning of "serial production" for the class. With serial production, the Navy is able to realize benefits such as improved cost structure per vessel and reduced construction time.

"Seeing multiple littoral combat ships on the Mobile waterfront is a beautiful thing," said Capt. Tom Anderson, LCS program manager. "Serial production is in full swing at both building yards and we are seeing ship construction milestones."

Following the launch, the ship will undergo outfitting, and test and evaluation of its major systems at the Austal shipyard.

The ship's christening, a ceremony that marks the official naming of the vessel, is planned for the spring.

The LCS class consists of two variants, the trimaran design Independence variant, and the monohull design Freedom variant. The ships are designed and built by two industry teams, led by Austal USA and Lockheed Martin, respectively. Jackson is the third LCS constructed by Austal USA.

Both variants within the LCS class are fast, agile, focused-mission platforms designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open ocean operation. The LCS is designed to embark specialized mission packages to defeat "anti-access" threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.

The Navy has been able to incorporate much of the knowledge gained in the construction, test and operation of LCS 1 and LCS 2, the lead ships of the class, into follow on ships.

Many of those are currently in various stages of construction, and will deliver to the Navy over the next few years. They include Jackson's sister ships; Montgomery (LCS 8), Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), Omaha (LCS 12), Manchester (LCS 14) and Tulsa (LCS 16).

Program Executive Office Littoral Combat Ships is affiliated with the Naval Sea Systems Command and provides a single program executive responsible for acquiring and sustaining mission capabilities of the littoral combat ship class, from procurement through fleet employment and sustainment. Delivering high-quality warfighting assets while balancing affordability and capability is key to supporting the Navy's Maritime Strategy.

For more news from Naval Sea Systems Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/navsea/.